The Science Missioner role exists to make connections between the church community and the local science community, to enable dialogue on matters of science and religion, and to help the church engage with some of the scientific issues that affect us all, such as global climate change and how to respond to the challenges it presents.This web site contains information about upcoming events, blog posts, an on-line book group and other material relevant to the Science Missioner project that I hope will be of interest. If you'd like to find out more about the Science Missioner project and the work being done, please do get in touch. Just click on the 'contact' button to send a message.Jennifer Brown

What the Science Missioner has to offer.

  • icon1 About us

    An initiative of the Churn Benefice and based within that group of churches, the Science Missioner project was launched in June 2014, with the Revd Jennifer Brown licensed as Science Missioner. The project seeks to make connections between science and faith, to raise …Read more

  • icon2 Events

    Welcome to the Science Missioner events calendar. Here you will find details of upcoming lectures, book group meetings and other events. All of the events listed here are open to the public. If you would like more information about an upcoming event, please contact us.…Read more

  • icon3 Forum

    The Science & Society book group meets in the real world once every two to three months. This on-line extension of the group was created to enable those who are interested in participating but not able to make it to meetings of the group to take part. …Read more

  • icon4 Blog

    Welcome to the Science Missioner Blog. Here you will find a mix of things including sermons on science-related subjects, reflections on the issues of science and faith, comment on scientific stories in the news in our area as well as the wider community. …Read more

  • Our Twitter feed is currently unavailable but you can visit our official twitter page @churnscience.

latest posts

This blog entry is a sermon preached at St John the Baptist, Kingston Bagpuize, on 17 September 2017. The Bible readings around which this sermon was constructed are Genesis 8.1-12; Matthew 16.1-3 I probably should start by acknowledging what an unusual pair of readings I’ve chosen for this morning. Although, when we think about what’s been going on in the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico over the past couple of weeks, readings about flooding and weather may, in fact, be all too apt!   The reason I chose them wasn’t, I must admit, anything to do with hurricanes. I chose these readings because both, in their way, are about people doing science. Nobody has ever asked me who my favourite scientist in the Bible is, largely because people don’t think that the Bible contains any science. But if anyone were to ask me, I’d probably say it was Noah. Whether you believe the story of Noah and the flood to be literally true, or think of it as a narrative that illustrates a deep truth … Read More...

  • Science in the Bible?

    This is the text of a talk I gave recently as part of a series of Lent lectures on science & religion. I began with the question, “Can you find science in the Bible?”.

    Posted  May 2016
  • Epiphany and astronomy

    Today is the Feast of the Epiphany. In the Church’s calendar, this is the day on which we celebrate the visit of the magi (wise men) to the infant Jesus. Anyone who has attended a church or school nativity play will be familiar with the story of the three wise men who, following a star, came from the east to bring gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh to the baby Jesus in Bethlehem. The star is a key player in this narrative, and many have wondered to what, exactly, the ‘star of Bethlehem’ refers.

    Posted  Jun 2016
tem-imgsci-imgchrun-img